"It was exciting and just a major, major compliment…I was happy for all the girls who would see me on [it] and feel a little more seen." - Lupita Nyong’o on being named People Magazine’s Most Beautiful

"It was exciting and just a major, major compliment…I was happy for all the girls who would see me on [it] and feel a little more seen." - Lupita Nyong’o on being named People Magazine’s Most Beautiful

702 of Mad Men was so good in so many ways, oh my god.

Dawn is now one of my favorite characters, and her last scene in the episode when she grins as the phone rings, is incredible. 

THIS SHOW IS SO GOOD, MAN.

christophwaltz:

Kevin Spacey for The Hollywood Reporter, April 2014

At 54, Spacey is in his prime, eagerly pursuing new obsessions and exalting in his contradictory status in Hollywood as a big-name star who operates like an eccentric outsider.

floriental:



Berlin Wall. Christmas 1962.

floriental:

Berlin Wall. Christmas 1962.

my tweets have been so meaningful lately

"Fuck the king."

the women of westeros ♢ two swords

soysaucing:

This is baby Butler saying I rather have superman as my father.

More than ever in the show, I felt like the events of 1968 could not be denied from personal experience. Before that, plenty of people are just living their lives and just ignoring a lot of things throughout the sixties. And by the time 1968 comes, an international revolution is going on. There is chaos. And my take was, People think Don is going to just retract. But actually, society is in the same state that Don is in.

The revolution is defeated in 1968: There is cultural change, but the tanks roll into Prague, the students go back to school, Bobby Kennedy comes out with an extremely radical agenda right before he is murdered. You do not hear a politician speaking this way before or after, running in a real party. I mean, maybe “Yes we can,” but that’s still not the same kind of rhetoric. Martin Luther King, Jr. being murdered was so shameful to white people—no one was wondering who did it, or how it happened. Rather, they were waiting for it, and then there it was, and they were part of it in some way.

So Don is back where he was in the pilot: He is in a marriage with someone who loves him, it is one-sided, and he is seeking comfort from this other woman. Why is he doing this? Because he is in a state of chaos. Part of it could be because he is afraid of dying; part of it could be that he cannot believe that he can be loved. Love is at the bottom of this whole thing; it is the constant rhetoric of the sixties.

What you’re watching with Don is a representation, to me, of American society. He is steeped in sin, haunted by his past, raised by animals, and there is a chance to revolt. And he cannot stop himself.

Kiernan Shipka, Jessica Pare, Elisabeth Moss, Jon Hamm, January Jones and Christina Hendricks - Mad Men Season 7 Premiere (April 2, 2014)